Let’s End California’s Housing Crisis

Support SB 827 – Sen. Wiener’s Transit Rich Housing Bonus Bill

The Rent is Too Damn High and Homes are too Expensive

SB 827 will end the shortage and create millions of homes

For decades, local obstructionism prevented enough home building to keep up with job and population growth in California. The result – rents and home prices continue to skyrocket. Including the cost of housing, California now has the highest poverty rate in the country. It’s time to stop this madness.

How SB 827 works

The bill would permit more home building near transit rich areas, like BART stations, Caltrain stops, the Expo line, and rapid, high-frequency bus lines. If SB 827 passes, more Californians will enjoy affordable and walkable neighborhoods with up to 4 – 8 story buildings. Last year, California passed laws to designate over $800 million per year for public transportation by increasing vehicle and gas taxes. SB 827 makes good on that investment by allowing more people to live near transit rich areas.

Sen. Wiener needs our help getting this bill passed, please sign the petition and tell your legislator that you support more home building near transit.

I support Sen. Wiener’s SB 827, a bill that would increase home building near transit. If passed, the bill would improve the quality of life for Californians by making housing more affordable and reducing pollution. The state made progress in 2017 by passing the 15-bill housing package, extending cap-and-trade, but Californians will continue to suffer high housing costs, breath dirty air, and spend too much time stuck in traffic until more housing is built where it’s needed most. California is for everyone. Please support SB 827.

Don't Just Take Our Word For It

SB 827 Addresses Many of the Most Urgent Problems Facing California

Environment

California’s Problem

Denying people access to housing near transit requires longer commutes, which increases pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Vehicles are the #1 source of GHG pollution in California. We will fail to meet our ambitious climate goals unless more Californians can access transit.

SB 827’s Solution

As the national Sierra Club magazine reported, families living in walkable communities near jobs and transit had a carbon footprint that was half that of families living in less dense areas.

Slowing Productivity and Economic Growth

California’s Problem

Productivity and wage growth has slowed over the past several decades. Scholars blame low-density zoning  in places like the San Francisco Bay Area for reducing economic productivity and growth so much that total UC economic growth would have been 50% higher over the past 50 years without them. This represents $8,775 in lost annual income for the average American.

SB 827’s Solution

Allow enough home building in areas with booming economies to accommodate migrants from other regions.

Less Time with Family and Friends

California’s Problem

Longer commutes are associated with decreased happiness and reduced cardiovascular health. The Bay Area has the highest percentage of “super commuters” in the country.  One Harvard sociologist found that, “Every ten minutes of commuting results in ten per cent fewer social connections. Commuting is connected to social isolation, which causes unhappiness.”

SB 827’s Solution

Let more people live near jobs and transit, so they can spend more time with their friends and families.

Inequality

California’s Problem

As the former Chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisors wrote, limiting home building increases wealth and income inequality while reducing social mobility.

SB 827’s Solution

Change zoning to allow more Californians to live near good-paying jobs.

Inclusive Communities

California’s Problem

Scholars at Princeton found that low-density zoning increases racial segregation, while scholars at UCLA found that density restrictions, such as single-family home zoning, increase economic segregation.

SB 827’s Solution

Increase allowable housing densities and allowable building height to encourage racial and economic inclusion.